TMA Aims to Reduce False Alarms

Since its founding in 1950, TMA has worked to create and grow relationships between its members and various public safety organizations, including first responders.  Nationally law enforcement responds to millions of calls to alarm systems where no crime or attempted crime has been committed. Research in this area tells us that over 75% of these false alarm calls are attributed to end user error rather than equipment failure.

The Security Industry Alarm Coalition (SIAC) staff has worked with various jurisdictions to focus on updating the terminology that companies use to train new alarm users on how to manage their alarm systems.  Efforts in Phoenix, Arizona have reduced the number of false alarms significantly by helping users conquer their fears by using simple to understand vocabulary when explaining how their alarm systems work.  By reframing a technical manual into a language that is comfortable and straightforward, alarm users are stepping up.

Examples include moving from “arming and disarming your system” to “turning your system on and off” and “your home” instead of “the premises or protected property” and providing tips such as adding the alarm company to a customer’s cell phone contact list and having the customer use their cell phone as the primary contact number.

TMA, along with SIAC, law enforcement and member volunteers, created this course to help our member companies educate customers on how to use alarm systems responsibly: “2019 False Alarm Impact Awareness Training: How You Can Prevent False Alarms.” This 30-minute narrated customer training helps alarm owners identify the most common mistakes they make and how to avoid them.

The bottom line is false alarms cost you, your customers, and your community money and resources. Once customers are comfortable with their alarm systems, they will avoid false alarms and maximize their security investment.

Included in the review are how alarm systems work and what your customers can do to avoid mistakes that cause false alarms.

By avoiding false alarms, users will be able to get the most out of their alarm systems and not worry about fines or suspension of services.  Your customers can rest easy knowing that when unexpected emergencies occur, their alarm company is there to respond to any alarms generated from their systems.

As more homes become automated in the era of The Smart Home, more people are including alarm systems as part of their connected space.  Parks Associates recently reported in their May 2019 newsletter that professional installation continues to be the dominant choice for home security systems, but self-installation experienced strong growth in 2017 and 2018.   Self-installed DIY security systems are increasing as systems are set up to interact with the user through a mobile device or a computer.

False alarm reduction is everyone’s responsibility. By setting up easy to follow steps, and reinforcing communication with the monitoring center, everyone can benefit from protecting their home and avoiding false alarms.

For more information, contact education@tma.us.

 

SIAC: St. Cloud FL Police Reporting 67% Reduction in Dispatches

 

Frisco, Texas (January 26, 2017) – The city of St. Cloud, Florida and its Police Department were presented with the Security Industry Alarm Coalition’s (SIAC) Director’s Award of Distinction, and the Alarm Association of Florida’s (AAF) Alarm Management Award for its outstanding work in reducing alarm dispatches.

St. Cloud Police Chief Pete Gauntlett was given SIAC’s Award of Distinction for his work on this project, along with the AAF award.

The city reduced its alarm dispatches by 67% in its first 12 months utilizing the model ordinance developed by SIAC and the Florida Police Chiefs Association (FPCA). The awards were given during a recent city council meeting.

The Security Industry Alarm Coalition’s National Law Enforcement Liaison, Glen Mowrey, and AAF representatives worked with the St. Cloud Police Department, city staff and the city attorney’s office on the project.

“Our success in reducing alarm calls allows officers to be more proactive in community policing activities,” said Chief Gauntlett.

Mowrey added, “Utilizing the FPCA Model Ordinance streamlines working with the agency in establishing an alarm management program.”

“In the case of St. Cloud, this positive outcome benefits the police department, the local community and our industry. It demonstrates that well-implemented alarm management practices provide the intended results, fewer dispatches,” said Stan Martin, SIAC Executive Director. “Police are freed to address other calls that may have greater public safety consequences. Customers are happy that they don’t have unnecessary alarm activations. In turn, security companies are in better shape because they can sell improved alarm management practices. The result equals fewer fines to the customer.”

 

 

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(L-R) SIAC’s Glen Mowrey, AAF’s Bob Neely, Sgt. Denise Roberts, Chief Pete Gauntlett, Mayor Rebecca Borders

About SIAC

SIAC represents one voice for the electronic security industry on alarm management issues, communicating solutions and enhancing relationships with law enforcement. SIAC is comprised of four major North American security associations – Canadian Security Association (CANASA), Security Industry Association (SIA), Central Station Alarm Association (CSAA), and the Electronic Security Association (ESA). For more information, go to www.SIACinc.org , www.siacinc.wordpress.com, or follow us on www.twitter.com/siacinc.

–Contributed by James Roth

Town of Lexington (SC) PD Receives SIAC Award for Reducing Alarm Calls

Lexington, SC (January 26, 2017) – The town of Lexington, SC and its Police Department were presented with the Security Industry Alarm Coalition’s (SIAC) Director’s Award of Distinction for its outstanding work in reducing alarm dispatches. The town reduced its alarm dispatches by 46% freeing up officers for community policing activities and problem solving projects. The award was presented to the town of Lexington, Chief Terence Green and staff during a recent town council meeting.

The Security Industry Alarm Coalition and representatives from the South Carolina Police Chiefs Association’s (SCPCA) Alarm Management Committee worked with the Lexington Police Department staff and the city attorney’s office using SCPCA’s Model Alarm Ordinance in reducing alarm dispatch requests.

“We feel very good about the success of our alarm management program, the results we’ve realized, and look forward to even greater reductions in the future,” said Chief Green. “Our partnership with SIAC and the SCPCA Alarm Management Committee has certainly aided us in reducing our alarm dispatches.”

SIAC’s National Law Enforcement Liaison Glen Mowrey added, “Developing strong partnerships and utilizing the Chiefs Association’s Model Alarm Ordinances adds to the success of an agencies alarm management program.”

“In the case of Lexington, this positive outcome benefits the police department, the local community and our industry. It demonstrates that well-implemented alarm management practices provide the intended results, fewer dispatches,” said Stan Martin, SIAC Executive Director. “Police are freed to address other calls that may have greater public safety consequences. Customers are happy that they don’t have unnecessary alarm activations. In turn, security companies are in better shape because they can sell improved alarm management practices. The result equals fewer fines to the customer.”

 

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(L to R) Patrolman First Class Ryan Whitlock, Mayor Steve MacDougall, Glen Mowrey, Chief Terrence Green, Lt. Matt Timmerman, Major Matt Davis, and Lt. Thomas Stowe.

About SIAC

SIAC represents one voice for the electronic security industry on alarm management issues –communicating solutions and enhancing relationships with law enforcement.  SIAC is comprised of four major North American security associations–Canadian Security Association (CANASA), Security Industry Association (SIA), Central Station Alarm Association (CSAA), and the Electronic Security Association (ESA). For more information, go to www.SIACinc.org , www.siacinc.wordpress.com, or follow us on www.twitter.com/siacinc.

–Contributed by James Roth